Tracking HIV in its voyage within the cells

A new technique to visualize HIV particles inside infected cells as they make their way to the nucleus is reported in the October issue of Nature Methods. Pierre Charneau’s and colleagues show HIV’s internal voyage with unprecedented detail for the first time.

PRESS RELEASE FOR NATURE METHODS
(<http://www.nature.com/nmeth/>)

This press release is copyrighted to Nature Methods.

PDFs of all the papers mentioned on this release can be found in the relevant journal’s section of http://press.nature.com. Press contacts for the Nature journals are listed at the end of this release.

Warning: This document, and the Nature papers to which it refers, may contain information that is price sensitive (as legally defined, for example, in the UK Criminal Justice Act 1993 Part V) with respect to publicly quoted companies. Anyone dealing in securities using information contained in this document or in advanced copies of Nature’s content may be guilty of insider trading under the US Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

HYPE: We take great care not to hype the papers mentioned on our press releases, but are sometimes accused of doing so. If you ever consider that a story has been hyped, please do not hesitate to contact us at [email protected], citing the specific example.

PLEASE CITE THE SPECIFIC NATURE JOURNAL AND WEBSITE AS THE SOURCE OF THE FOLLOWING ITEMS. IF PUBLISHING ONLINE, PLEASE CARRY A HYPERLINK TO THE APPROPRIATE JOURNAL’S WEBSITE.

Tracking HIV in its voyage within the cells

DOI: 10.1038/nmeth928

A new technique to visualize HIV particles inside infected cells as they make their way to the nucleus is reported in the October issue of Nature Methods. Pierre Charneau’s and colleagues show HIV’s internal voyage with unprecedented detail for the first time.

Once HIV has infected a cell, the viral genome makes its way to the nucleus of the cell, where it integrates into a chromosome to complete infection. It is known that some of the viral proteins coating the HIV genome are gradually lost along the way, but it is still unclear how exactly HIV the exact process of how HIV particles go from the periphery of the cell to inside the nucleus. By fluorescently labeling the Integrase protein, a viral protein that remains associated with the HIV genome until integration into a human chromosome, the group succeeded in following the virus all the way from cell entry to inside the nucleus. In addition, they developed sophisticated software that allows them to precisely analyze very small movements of the viral particle. Using this tool, they were able to distinguish different speeds and shapes of movements characteristic of several cytoskeleton transport systems. Their results indicate that HIV particles inside the cell hitchhike on different types of internal cell fibers until reaching the nucleus.

This work sheds light on the mechanism of HIV transport inside the cell and provides a useful tool to understand HIV interaction with the infected cells so that new ways of blocking infection can be envisioned.

Author contact:
Pierre Charneau (Institut Pasteur, Paris, France)
Tel: +33 1 45 68 88 22; Email: [email protected]

News and Views: David McDonald (Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USA)
Tel: +1 216 368 3715; Email: [email protected]

Other papers to be published in the October issue of Nature Methods:

Minimizing the risk of reporting false positives in large-scale RNAi screens

DOI: 10.1038/ nmeth1006

Channelrhodopsin-2 and optical control of excitable cells

DOI: 10.1038/nmeth936

Sub-diffraction-limit imaging by stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM)

DOI: 10.1038/nmeth929

Imaging diacylglycerol dynamics at organelle membranes

DOI: 10.1038/nmeth930

Defining the actual sensitivity and specificity of the neurosphere assay in stem cell biology

DOI: 10.1038/nmeth926

Clonal isolation of hESCs reveals heterogeneity within the pluripotent stem cell compartment

DOI: 10.1038/nmeth939

State-based discovery: a multidimensional screen for small-molecule modulators of EGF signaling

DOI: 10.1038/nmeth931

Evidence of off-target effects associated with long dsRNAs in Drosophila melanogaster cell-based assays

DOI: 10.1038/nmeth935

A recombineering pipeline for functional genomics applied to Caenorhabditis elegans

DOI: 10.1038/nmeth933

PRESS CONTACTS…

For North America and Canada

Katie McGoldrick, Nature Washington

Tel: +1 202 737 2355; E-mail: [email protected]

For Japan, Korea, China, Singapore and Taiwan

Itsumi Kitahara, Nature Tokyo

Tel: +81 3 3267 8751; E-mail: [email protected]

For the UK/Europe/other countries not listed above

Helen Jamison, Nature London

Tel: +44 20 7843 4658; E-mail [email protected]

About Nature Publishing Group

Nature Publishing Group (NPG) is a division of Macmillan Publishers Ltd, dedicated to serving the academic, professional scientific and medical communities. NPG's flagship title, Nature, is the world's most highly-cited weekly multidisciplinary journal and was first published in 1869. Other publications and services include Nature research journals, Nature Reviews, Nature Clinical Practice, a range of prestigious academic journals, including society-owned publications, news content from [email protected]nature.com and scientific career information from Naturejobs.

NPG is a global company, with headquarters in London and offices in New York, San Francisco, Washington DC, Boston, Tokyo, Paris, Munich, Hong Kong, Melbourne, Gurgaon, Mexico City and Basingstoke. For more information, please go to www.nature.com <http://www.nature.com>.

Published: 21 Sep 2006

Contact details:

The Macmillan Building, 4 Crinan Street
London
N1 9XW
United Kingdom

+44 20 7833 4000
Country: 
Journal:
News topics: 
Content type: 
Websites: 
Reference: 

NATURE METHODS

Medicine