Plastic electronics rivals amorphous silicon; Genetic variants associated with common skin disorders

A polymer with an electronic performance equivalent to that of amorphous silicon has been developed; Mutations in a gene called filaggrin are associated with elevated risks of atopic disease - atopic dermatitis (eczema or inflamed, itchy skin), allergy, and asthma

NATURE AND THE NATURE RESEARCH JOURNALS PRESS RELEASE

For papers that will be published online on March 19th 2006

This press release is copyrighted to the Nature journals mentioned below.

This press release contains:
* Summaries of newsworthy papers:
* Plastic electronics rivals amorphous silicon - Nature Materials
* Genetic variants associated with common skin disorders - Nature Genetics
* Mention of papers to be published at the same time with the same embargo
* Geographical listing of authors

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****************************NATURE MATERIALS************************
(<http://www.nature.com/naturematerials>)

[1] Plastic electronics rivals amorphous silicon

DOI: 10.1038/nmat1612

A polymer with an electronic performance equivalent to that of amorphous silicon has been developed, as reported in the April issue of Nature Materials. The work, carried out by a team of industrial and academic researchers in the UK and the US, demonstrates that printed polymeric materials have finally achieved the speed and performance that will enable them to match that of current transistors. In the new polymer material, individual molecules align with each other more effectively than ever before. The result is an electronic performance six times better than previously reported. This, coupled with good stability in
air, makes such polymers ideal candidates to replace more traditional materials such as amorphous silicon, providing cheap and easy routes to future products. Electronics made from polymers offer the potential for flexible, low-cost circuits for everyday products. This is possible because the polymers can be processed using simple printing techniques.

Author contact:
Iain McCulloch (Chilworth Science Park, Southampton, UK)
Tel: +44 2380 763311; E-mail: [email protected]

Other papers from Nature Materials to be published online at the same time and with the same embargo:

[2] Metallotropic liquid crystals formed by surfactant templating of molten metal halides
DOI: 10.1038/nmat1610

[3] Kinetically-driven self assembly of highly-ordered nanoparticle monolayers
DOI: 10.1038/nmat1611

[4] Carrier-controlled ferromagnetism in transparent oxide semiconductors
DOI: 10.1038/nmat1613

**************************NATURE GENETICS*****************************
(<http://www.nature.com/naturegenetics>)

[5] Genetic variants associated with common skin disorders

DOI: 10.1038/ng1767

Mutations in a gene called filaggrin are associated with elevated risks of atopic disease - atopic dermatitis (eczema or inflamed, itchy skin), allergy, and asthma - according to a study published in the April issue of Nature Genetics. Mutations in filaggrin - which is a component of the skin that prevents entry of allergens, toxins, and infectious organisms - had previously been shown by Irwin McLean and colleagues at the University of Dundee to cause a skin disorder called ichthyosis vulgaris (scaly skin). Noting that many individuals with this disease also have atopic dermatitis, McLean and colleagues have now assessed the influence of these filaggrin mutations on the risk of developing atopic dermatitis in the general population. Loss of filaggrin function was associated in each cohort studied
with a highly significant risk of developing atopic dermatitis and the subtype of asthma that accompanies it, although it was not associated with risk of developing asthma independent of dermatitis. The authors suggest that a loss of filaggrin leads to a defect in the skin barrier, which makes individuals susceptible to disease-triggering allergen transfer through the skin. Atopic disease affects about 20% of the population in the developed world. The two filaggrin mutations studied are present in 9% of people of European origin.

Author contact:
Irwin McLean (University of Dundee, UK)
Tel: +44 1382 425 618, E-mail: [email protected]

Other papers from Nature Genetics to be published online at the same time and with the same embargo:

[6] Mutations in the facilitative glucose transporter GLUT10 alter angiogenesis and cause arterial tortuosity syndrome DOI: 10.1038/ng1764

[7] Distribution of fitness effects among beneficial mutations before selection in experimental populations of bacteria DOI: 10.1038/ng1751

[8] In vivo RNA interference demonstrates a role for Nramp1 in modifying susceptibility to type 1 diabetes DOI: 10.1038/ng1766

[9] Functional classification of drugs by properties of their pairwise interactions
DOI: 10.1038/ng1755

****************************************************************
Items from other Nature journals to be published online at the same time and with the same embargo:

Nature (<http://www.nature.com/nature>)

[10] Synaptic scaling mediated by glial TNF-alpha
DOI: 10.1038/nature04671

[11] Spatiotemporal dynamics of RhoA activity in migrating cells
DOI: 10.1038/nature04665

Nature MEDICINE (<http://www.nature.com/naturemedicine>)

[12] Newly expressed SUR1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel mediates cerebral edema
after ischemic stroke
DOI: 10.1038/nm1390

[13] Predicting the clinical outcome of congenital unilateral ureteropelvic junction obstruction in newborn by urinary proteome analysis
DOI: 10.1038/nm1384

[14] Thymus-derived leukemia-lymphoma in mice transgenic for the Tax gene of human T-lymphotropic virus type I
DOI: 10.1038/nm1389

[15] Selective cytotoxic T-lymphocyte targeting of tumor immune escape variants
DOI: 10.1038/nm1381

Nature BIOTECHNOLOGY (<http://www.nature.com/naturebiotechnology>)

[16] Engineering of a monomeric green-to-red photoactivatable fluorescent protein induced by blue light
DOI: 10.1038/nbt1191

[17] Characterization of voltage-gated sodium-channel blockers by electrical stimulation and fluorescence detection of membrane potential
DOI: 10.1038/nbt1194

Nature NEUROSCIENCE (<http://www.nature.com/natureneuroscience>)

[18] Noise characteristics and prior expectations in human visual speed perception
DOI: 10.1038/nn1669

[19] Heterogeneity in the pyramidal network of the medial prefrontal cortex
DOI: 10.1038/nn1670

[20] Olfactory experience accelerates glomerular refinement in the mammalian olfactory bulb
DOI: 10.1038/nn1673

[21] A somatotopic map of vibrissa motion direction within a barrel column
DOI: 10.1038/nn1671

[22] Fear conditioning drives profiling into amygdala dendritic spines
DOI: 10.1038/nn1672

[23] Negative functional MRI response correlates with decreases in neuronal activity in monkey visual area V1
DOI: 10.1038/nn1675

NATURE CELL BIOLOGY (<http://www.nature.com/naturecellbiology>)

[24] The KLHL12-Cullin-3 ubiquitin ligase negatively regulates the Wnt-beta-catenin pathway by targeting Dishevelled for degradation
DOI: 10.1038/ncb1381

[25] NEMO is a sensor of Lys63-linked polyubiquitination and functions in NF-kB activation
DOI: 10.1038/ncb1384

Nature STRUCTURAL & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
(<http://www.nature.com/natstructmolbiol>)

[26] In vivo assembly of functional U7 snRNP requires RNA backbone flexibility within the Sm-binding site
DOI: 10.1038/nsmb1075

*****************************************************************

GEOGRAPHICAL LISTING OF AUTHORS

The following list of places refers to the whereabouts of authors on the papers numbered in this release. The listing may be for an author's main affiliation, or for a place where they are working temporarily. Please see the PDF of the paper for full details.

BELGIUM
Antwerp: 6
Ghent: 6

CANADA
Ottawa: 7

DENMARK
Aarhus: 7
Copenhagen: 5

FRANCE
Montpellier: 7
Paris: 5
Toulouse: 13

GERMANY
Hannover: 13
Tuebingen: 23

INDIA
Bhuvaneswar: 4

IRELAND
Dublin: 5, 14

ISRAEL
Haifa: 22

ITALY
Brescia: 6

JAPAN
Tokyo: 14
Supporo: 14
Osaka: 14

THE NETHERLANDS
Amsterdam:
Bilthoven: 15
Leiden: 15
Rotterdam: 6

RUSSIA
Moscow: 16

SWEDEN
Stockholm: 15

SWITZERLAND
Lausanne: 19

UNITED KINGDOM
Cambridge: 8
Dundee: 5
Glasgow: 5
Southhampton:1
St Andrews: 5

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
Alabama
Tuscaloosa: 4
California
La Jolla: 11
Los Angeles: 14
Menlo Park: 1
Palo Alto: 1, 10
San Diego: 17
Stanford: 1
Connecticut
New Haven: 6, 19, 26
Idaho
Boise: 4
Illinois
Argonne: 3
Chicago: 3
Maryland
Baltimore: 6, 12
Bethesda: 5, 20, 25
Gaithersburg: 5
Massachusetts
Boston: 8, 9, 19, 21
Cambridge: 4, 8, 9, 21
Nevada
Reno: 19
New Jersey
Rahway: 8
New York
Bronx: 16
Manhasset: 6
New York: 18, 22
North Carolina
Chapel Hill: 11
Raleigh: 2
Oregon
Portland: 12
Rhode Island
Providence: 5
Washington
Seattle: 5, 24

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Beatrice Chrystall
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Nature Genetics (New York)
Orli Bahcall
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Nature Immunology (New York)
Laurie Dempsey
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Nature Materials (London)
Maria Bellantone
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Nature Medicine (New York)
Juan Carlos Lopez
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Nature Neuroscience (New York)
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Alison Wright
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Published: 19 Mar 2006

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