Biology

News

04 Nov 2020
Innovative research by scientists at Duke-NUS Medical School has shed light on the mysterious role of long non-coding RNAs in the development of pancreatic cancer and suggests potential new targets for precision cancer therapies.
Broken Hill Mine, Kabwe
04 Nov 2020
Residents of Kabwe Town, Zambia, have very high blood levels of lead and cadmium, to such an extent that the symptoms of toxicity have been clinically observed.
03 Nov 2020
A recent study, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has proposed a new technique that controls the spatiotemporal resolution of Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) within a single image.
02 Nov 2020
DGIST scientists are learning more about the molecular processes involved in the formation of well-communicating nerve fibres.
30 Oct 2020
Maternal antibodies primed to react to specific allergens can cross the placenta, passing on transiently allergic reactions to offspring, according to new preclinical research from a collaborative study by the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, and Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore. The finding hints at why infants exhibit allergies so early in life and suggests possible targets for intervention.
Outline of ChemTHEATRE
29 Oct 2020
ChemTHEATRE was launched in 2016 in order to provide easy access to monitoring data of chemicals in the environment. Data from different sources are stored in a well-organized format. ChemTHEATRE providing useful information more systematically than ever before.
Lysosomes in a breast cancer cell.
29 Oct 2020
Scientists have revealed the molecular mechanism regulating the trafficking of lysosomes that increases the invasiveness of radioresistant cancer cells following radiotherapy.
26 Oct 2020
Study confirms bats adopt multiple strategies to reduce pro-inflammatory responses, thus mitigating potential immune-mediated tissue damage and disease. Findings provide important insights for medical research on human diseases.
Hiroshima University joined the global fight against COVID-19 last April through the “Hiroshima University CoV-Peace-Project.”
23 Oct 2020
Therapeutic drugs, a novel test method, a fully automated testing process, and a way to conduct medical diagnosis remotely are just some of the research being done at Hiroshima University to beat COVID-19.
20 Oct 2020
Osaka City University detects cancer cells in 2ml blood samples and connects them back to their origin tumor – creating a new diagnostic tool that may aid in quicker and more accurate anti-cancer measures.
20 Oct 2020
Researchers at Kanazawa University and University of California, San Francisco report in Science that arbitrary proteins, when combined with anchoring and receptor proteins, can work as a signaling protein “morphogen” capable of engineered spatial patterning.
14 Oct 2020
Osaka City University unravels the atomic architecture of the “Nap” protein complex found on Mycoplasma pneumoniae.
Hokkaido University
12 Oct 2020
Scientists have estimated that the age of an individual does not indicate how likely they are to be infected by SARS-CoV-2. However, development of symptoms, progression of the disease, and mortality are age-dependent.
12 Oct 2020
Collaboration by researchers in Singapore and Australia lead to first-of-its-kind computational biology algorithm that could enable more effective cellular therapies against major diseases.
07 Oct 2020
Adaptive radiation - the rapid evolution of many new species from a single ancestor - is a major focus in evolutionary biology. Adaptive radiations often show remarkable repeatability where lineages have undergone multiple episodes of adaptive radiation in distant places and at various points in time - implying their extraordinary evolutionary potential.
06 Oct 2020
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Nature Communications the mechanism making some lung-cancer patients resistant to the drug osimertinib. In addition, they suggest a combined drug treatment resolving osimertinib resistance in the case of cancer cells expressing low amounts of AXL, a protein belonging to the class of receptor tyrosine kinases.
Image_iCeMS_Kamei_OpticsLetters
03 Oct 2020
A new apparatus improves how we study the effects of aiming high-field terahertz radiation at cells, with implications for regenerative medicine.
Humboldt squid size
02 Oct 2020
Marine biologists studying the genetic structure of the Humboldt squid population found it is vulnerable to overfishing by fleets on its migration path.
01 Oct 2020
Scientists have found an ingredient that makes a vaccine more effective through an approach more often seen in materials science – testing molecules that self-assemble into larger structures.
30 Sep 2020
Scientists have identified key molecules that mediate radioresistance in glioblastoma multiforme; these molecules are a potential target for the treatment of this brain cancer.
Hokkaido University
29 Sep 2020
Climate warming will alter marine community compositions as species are expected to shift poleward, significantly impacting the Arctic marine ecosystem.
28 Sep 2020
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba demonstrate that the hypnotic and teratogenic effects of thalidomide are separable. Thalidomide is a medication with several different effects, one of which is promoting sleep in the context of insomnia. In a new study, researchers from the University of Tsukuba have discovered that thalidomide exerts its hypnotic effects through mechanisms distinct from those for the drug’s notorious teratogenicity. These are striking results showing how thalidomide induces sleep independently of its known effects on the teratogenic cereblon pathway. These findings could be helpful in developing novel thalidomide-like hypnotic drugs without thalidomide’s teratogenic effects. The study was published in the scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America.
28 Sep 2020
Testing self-collected saliva samples could offer an easy and effective mass testing approach for detecting asymptomatic COVID-19.
18 Sep 2020
Drugs tackling chronic myelogenous leukemia have completely transformed prognoses of patients over the last couple of decades, with most cases going into remission. But drug resistance can occur, leading to relapses. Targeting the lipids involved in regulating part of a leukemia stem cell’s life span offers a potential second route to defeat the disease—and solid tumorous cancers as well.
15 Sep 2020
A team of scientists has unraveled the molecular mechanism behind one of the causes of colorectal cancer, and a treatment target.
14 Sep 2020
Scientists at Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, show that it is possible to distinguish between left-handed and right-handed people by noninvasively monitoring just their brain activity during passive tactile stimulation. These results are key in haptic research (the study of sensory systems) and have various important implications for brain–computer interfaces, augmented reality, and even artificial intelligence.
Three developing stages and OH-PCBs concentration of a Japanese macaque fetus
14 Sep 2020
This study selected the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) as a model animal for the fetal transfer of OH-PCBs in humans, and revealed OH-PCB concentrations and their relationships in the maternal and fetal brains. The key finding from this study is that OH-PCBs can reach the developing brain of the fetus as early as the first trimester of pregnancy. These OH-PCBs may exceed the levels that induce adverse effects on neurodevelopment.
09 Sep 2020
Running is a fundamental mode of human movement that most of us perform effortlessly without conscious thought. Some may run regularly for exercise, or even undergo serious, professional training for completing marathons. This apparent ease of running belies the enormous biomechanical complexity of running, the coordinated control of which is accomplished by an intricate neuronal network in the brain and spinal cord.
Macrophage Activation Syndrome in COVID-19
08 Sep 2020
Scientists review macrophage activation syndrome — a feature of the cytokine storm that kills patients with severe cases of COVID-19, as well as possible treatments.
07 Sep 2020
Researchers at Kanazawa University report in Nature Communications the discovery that in the developing fly brain, neurons stemming from the same parent cell experience repulsion. This lineage-dependent repulsion is regulated by a protein known as Dscam1.

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