Press releases

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Nature Publishing Group
05 Jan 2006
Grammatical rules can be applied to describe the functions of proteins, say researchers in the January issue of Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology.
Universiti Sains Malaysia
05 Jan 2006
IJAPS is a scholarly, multidisciplinary, internationally refereed publication focusing primarily on Asia (South, Southeast and East), Australasia and the Pacific Rim regions of the Americas (North, Central and South).
Nature Publishing Group
04 Jan 2006
Summaries of newsworthy papers from Nature. Vol.438 No.7072 Dated 5 January 2006 including Cancer: Caspase-8 as a metastasis suppressor gene; Nanoparticles assemble themselves and Bees show how pollen and nectar collectors diverge.
Universiti Sains Malaysia
04 Jan 2006
The UAV is locally designed, manufactured, integrated and tested. It can be used as an alternative solution to manned aircraft, for operations such as search and rescue, maritime patrol, urban traffic control, surveillance and military applications.
Indian Science Congress Association
04 Jan 2006
India is set to become a Developed Nation by 2020. Despite all the achievements made in the fields of science and technology, food front, industries, twenty six percent of India's population is below the poverty line with no security of any kind.
Keio University
04 Jan 2006
For the past few years, the Institute has supported research projects on “Media Stereotyping,” “Power and Journalism,” “Internet Development and Civic Culture in Japan,” and “Content Distribution in the Asia and Pacific Regions.”
Divan Enterprise (indianjournals.com)
04 Jan 2006
Haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS) is a distinct bacterial disease of cattle and buffaloes, and is of economic importance in many parts of world.
Divan Enterprise (indianjournals.com)
04 Jan 2006
This paper reflects upon the recent vigorous empirical and policy debate about whether significant mineral endowments are a blessing or a curse for the large number of developing nations that possess them.
Divan Enterprise (indianjournals.com)
30 Dec 2005
India is the third-largest coal miner after China and the US. This paper examines the illegal coal economy, attempts to explain it, provides some policy suggestions and an estimate of the amount of coal supplied in this manner throughout the eastern Indian coalfields of Jharkhand and West Bengal.
Divan Enterprise (indianjournals.com)
30 Dec 2005
After carbon dioxide, methane is the second major green house gas contributing to global warming but methane is 20–40 times more potent as green house gas. This paper suggest various methods of reducing the production of methane in animal farming.
Divan Enterprise (indianjournals.com)
30 Dec 2005
The topics in this issue include small-scale illegal coal supply in India; Are minerals a blessing or a curse? Impact of education on economic development in Nigeria; Environmental economics in practice; Outgrowing the Earth: The food security challenge
Divan Enterprise (indianjournals.com)
30 Dec 2005
Published by Sher-E-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology – Jammu. Topics include organic farming, methane reduction strategies, impact of insect pollinators, studies in rape, rice, broccoli, cauliflower, fertility, soil and water conservation, efficiency of herbicides and many more.
Universiti Sains Malaysia
21 Dec 2005
Spot Electroplater for Lead Frame (SPEL) have been designed to cater to existing problems faced by the rubber masking technique, presently applied in lead frame manufacturing industries.
International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA)
21 Dec 2005
This report presents findings of a study conducted in 1997-2001 in the Syria Badia to test different water-harvesting techniques for improving vegetative cover.
Nature Publishing Group
21 Dec 2005
Male Asian elephants are famed for their annual bouts of heightened sexual activity and aggression, during which they produce a delicately concocted, notoriously pungent cocktail of chemicals to advertise their mating status.
Nature Publishing Group
21 Dec 2005
Researchers present the atomic structure of one of the parasite proteins that recognizes human red blood cells and facilitates parasite invasion into host cells. This should have a direct effect on both drug and vaccine development against malaria.
Nature Publishing Group
21 Dec 2005
Three papers present the almost complete genome sequences of three fungus species: Aspergillus oryzae, used for food production; Aspergillus fumigatus, a common pathogen; and Aspergillus nidulans, a model organism used by many fungus geneticists.
Nature Publishing Group
21 Dec 2005
Summaries of newsworthy papers from Nature Vol.438 No.7071 including Dance hall moves show off symmetry and sex appeal and Blast from the past
The World Academy of Sciences (TWAS)
21 Dec 2005
TWAS, the Academy of Sciences for the Developing World, has announced its 2005 prize winners. The annual TWAS Prizes, awarded in eight fields of scientific research, rank among the highest scientific accolades given to scientists in developing countries.
Keio University
18 Dec 2005
The Institute investigates the nature of human cognitive capacities and socio-cultural interactions, adopting an interdisciplinary approach across humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.
Quaid-i-Azam University
18 Dec 2005
Everyday, we use many different types of liquids. Understanding their flow behaviour is very important. This paper studies how the flow of a viscoelastic liquid in a pipe changes by imposing alternating pressures.
Nature Publishing Group
18 Dec 2005
A new study in the January issue of Nature Genetics reports that individuals with particular combinations of genetic variants are less susceptible to infection by the SARS virus.
Nature Publishing Group
18 Dec 2005
Japanese researchers have found that a rice plant that grows with its shoots more erect will produce more grains than normal.
Nature Publishing Group
18 Dec 2005
Using a new technique, geneticists have reached into the past to reconstruct the genetic sequence of the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius).
Nature Publishing Group
18 Dec 2005
Researchers demonstrate an easy and very flexible control over microfluidic flow by using suspended gold nanoparticles; Motor neurons secrete a mutant protein produced from a particular gene, setting off a chain of events that leads to cell death.
Nature Publishing Group
14 Dec 2005
The Indus river, Pakistan's major river, supplied water to one of the earliest of all human civilizations, and gave its name to India. But according to a paper in this week's Nature, it was once fed by a source different from today's.
Nature Publishing Group
14 Dec 2005
Science entries in the online encyclopaedia Wikipedia are not markedly less accurate those in Encyclopaedia Britannica. That's the conclusion of a Nature investigation
Nature Publishing Group
14 Dec 2005
Early humans were living in Britain as much as 700,000 years ago, according to a newly discovered set of flint tools that provides evidence that early human species journeyed across the Alps and into northern Europe much earlier than experts had suspected
Nature Publishing Group
14 Dec 2005
Summaries of newsworthy papers from Nature Vol.438 No.7070 including Cell biology: How stem cells arrange to shape feathers; Molecular biology: The secrets of ion channels unbound; Insight into angiogenesis; Weird bubbles wearing armour
Divan Enterprise (indianjournals.com)
14 Dec 2005
The book should provide an interesting reading for policy-makers, reform consultants, and academics and help inculcate added pragmatism in their work on the electricity sector reforms.