Humanities Arts

News

30 Jun 2024
A 90-acre garden complex in the heart of New Delhi, Lodi Gardens is one of the city’s most-loved public parks. Surprisingly, it is actually a tomb complex — dotted with mosques and domes from the Sayyid, Lodi and Mughal eras. Explore the park’s cultural and geographical significance by tracing the garden's history from the 15th century to the present, and read about the iconic figures and architectural styles associated with the monument.
Lingnan University’s Chamber of Young Snow Art Exhibition Hall curates Sensing Things - Phase II, Chinese paintings and ceramics from the Song Dynasty to the 20th century
25 Jun 2024
Lingnan University’s Chamber of Young Snow Art Exhibition Hall (CYS Hall) curates Sensing Things - Phase II from now until November, exhibiting about 30 Chinese paintings and ceramics dating from the Song Dynasty to the 20th century from the Chamber of Young Snow Collection. The guided tour is free of charge, and CYS Hall will also hold two “Hands-on Journey of Traditional Ceramic Art: Porcelain Decoration” workshops in July, where participants create their own ceramic masterpieces. The public can register for free, but space is limited, and available on a first-come, first-served basis.
21 Jun 2024
Associated with the forest and healing herbs, the goddess Parnashavari is revered for her ability to cure illnesses, contagious diseases and epidemics. A folk deity for the Shavari or Sabara indigenous community of central and eastern India, she was later integrated into the Buddhist pantheon and continues to be venerated in the Himalayan regions of Nepal and Tibet. Learn about her iconography and the symbolic objects and weapons she wields.
©The.Plumber.King Yim Chiu-tong, ©The.Plumber.King at Tai Nam Street, 2022, paint on canvas. ©The.Plumber.King
20 Jun 2024
To propose a deeper understanding and appreciation of Hong Kong's urban landscape, Lingnan University is proud to present a tripartite exhibition at the Jockey Club Creative Arts Centre (JCCAC) from 22 June to 30 June 2024 with three independent themes: "Unfold City", "Beyond Fonts, Beyond Signboards", and "C-Lab: Laboratory for Cultural Hybridisation". Works displayed are by 18 artists based in Hong Kong and Mainland China, and include The.Plumber.King at Tai Nam Street by Hong Kong's best-known graffiti artist and plumber, Yim Chiu-tong, who has already taken part in many major exhibitions, as well as Shun Hing Restaurant by local illustrator and silhouette artist Wai Wai. The exhibition leads the audience to explore, understand, and appreciate the urban landscape of Hong Kong from a contemporary art perspective.
30 May 2024
Renowned for its gleaming silver and gold inlay against dark metallic backgrounds, Bidriware metal work derives its name from the town of its origin — Bidar in southern India. While the earliest documented presence of Bidriware is in a 1625 Deccani miniature painting, the craft is believed to have originated in the 14th century under the patronage of the Bahmani Sultans. Bidriware's allure ensured that it was valued and patronised by royalty across the Indian subcontinent in the late medieval and early modern period. Read about this living tradition, and the processes behind the creation of Bidriware.
13 May 2024
Late in the sixteenth century, a master artist from the Mughal emperor Akbar’s atelier adopted the technique of using monochromatic tones with highlights of colour or gold. Known as ‘nim qalam,’ Persian for ‘half pen,’ or ‘siyah qalam’ for ‘black pen’, this technique was eventually adopted by artists in the Deccan, and later the Rajput courts. Although its precise origins remain uncertain, nim qalam continues to be used by contemporary South Asian artists working on manuscript painting.
15 Apr 2024
Once a two-armed attendant to the goddess Tara, over time, Marichi was increasingly endowed with power until she became a deity in her own right. Revered as a warrior and guardian against evil and darkness, Marichi’s imagery reveals myriad symbolisms — from her association with the sun to her role as a fierce protector. Read about the multifaceted nature of Marichi's mythology and imagery, spanning nations, cultures, and time.
01 Apr 2024
In India’s dry, western-most state — Rajasthan — the gods are carried from village to village, and tales that surround the deity are narrated so that the devout may be blessed. The gods are housed in a ‘kavad’, a portable shrine adorned with intricate narrative paintings of folk tales and epics. Constructed from low-density wood and painted with mineral-derived pigments, the kavad serves as a conduit for the oral storytelling tradition known as kavad banchana. Learn about the synergy between the makers, painters and patrons of these shrines, and how this tradition continues to evolve.
19 Mar 2024
In the late 1930s, French archaeologists discovered a large and remarkable group of ivory sculptures, in Afghanistan's Begram (present-day Bagram). Stipulated to have been used as accents or embellishments for wooden furniture, these carved objects showcase a blend of Greco-Roman, Central Asian, Mediterranean, and Indic stylistic influences. Despite the political upheavals in the region, some of these ivory artefacts still survive. Explore how ongoing scholarly efforts shed light on the historical significance of these art objects, highlighting the cultural connections that were built and flourished along the Silk Road.
04 Mar 2024
In the early seventeenth century, the royal ateliers of the Mewar kingdom, in present-day western India, witnessed the emergence of a new miniature painting tradition. The Mewar School, as it is known, was patronised by the ruling Sisodia dynasty. Stemming from manuscript illustration, this tradition evolved to encompass intricately detailed portraiture. Delve into the evolution of the Mewar School, tracing its distinct styles, aesthetic influences, master artists, and the shifting preferences of its royal patrons.
19 Feb 2024
Dated to the fourteenth century, the Chandayana is a Sufi romance that narrates the story of the lovelorn protagonists — Chanda and Laurik — in rhyming couplets. It was composed in the Awadhi dialect of Hindi, by the Chishti poet Mulla Daud. Five illustrated manuscripts of the poem were created between the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, and they are housed in five different locations worldwide. These illustrated texts provide a lens into the history of manuscript paintings in the Indian subcontinent.
Opening keynote presentation by Prof Simon Marginson, Director of CGHE (right).
18 Feb 2024
Prof Joshua Mok Ka-ho, Vice-President and Dean of the School of Graduate Studies of Lingnan University, presented at the Centre for Global Higher Education's (CGHE) Annual Conference 2024 at the Institute of Education, University College London, United Kingdom. The conference, which was titled "The Future of Higher Education", brought together scholars and researchers from around the world to discuss the opportunities and challenges facing higher education in the 21st century.
Lingnan University holds its Staff Communication Day & Staff Party 2024, where President Qin shares the latest developments at the University.
17 Feb 2024
Lingnan University held its Staff Communication Day and Staff Party 2024 yesterday (15 February), where around 700 faculty members and staff gathered to celebrate the Year of the Dragon. This was the first university-wide event of its kind since Prof S. Joe Qin, President and Wai Kee Kau Chair Professor of Data Science of Lingnan University took office last year, connecting with all faculty members and staff and sharing the latest developments at the University.
29 Jan 2024
Nestled in northern Karnataka, the Badami cave temples of India are adorned with a unique blend of intricate carvings that draw religious motifs from Shaivite, Vaishnavite and Jain traditions. Learn more about these 2nd-century rock-cut shrines that bear testament to ancient Indian royal patronage and religious syncretism.
15 Jan 2024
The Punjab regions of India and Pakistan bear witness to a centuries-old, laborious tradition of embroidering cloth with silk threads. Called Vari da Bagh and Bagh, meaning “‘garden”’, these textiles are ritually significant and are adorned with geometric patterns or motifs that draw from the everyday life and culture of the region.
01 Jan 2024
In the 16th and 17th centuries, religious ivory statuettes sculpted in colonial Goa sported a unique amalgamation of European and ancient Indian symbolisms. Discover the history of this Indo-Portuguese iconography and its ties to local evangelism, slavery and colonial export.
18 Dec 2023
Amongst the earliest objects unearthed from Gandhara are carved stone dishes depicting guardian spirits, mythical creatures and scenes of merrymaking. Despite the carvings being rich in artistic and cultural information, they reveal little about the functions of these objects. Learn more about these enigmatic artefacts, and the material history of ancient Gandhara.
04 Dec 2023
Since nearly the twelfth century, painters, called ‘patuas’, lived around the Jagannatha Temple at Puri in Odisha, painting tales from Hindu and Islamic religious mythologies, and local legends onto cloth scrolls. Discover how the rituals and festivals of the temple, and its principal deities — Jagannatha, Balabhadra, and Subhadra — inspire these paintings.
20 Nov 2023
Created by western India’s nomadic Vaghri community, mata ni pachedi is a tradition of cloth painting dating back 300 years. Originally meant as canopies for shrines and as objects of ritual worship, these textiles depict a pantheon of local goddesses surrounded by regional motifs. Read on to understand how printing, painting and cloth come together in religious consumerism.
06 Nov 2023
Since the 3rd century CE, master puppeteers of southern India have brought the epics of the subcontinent to life through Tholu Bommalata, a form of shadow puppetry performed with elaborate, life-sized leather puppets. Come discover this intricate musical theatre tradition that has been passed down from generation to generation and continues to thrive to this day.
20 Oct 2023
The Cholamandal Artists' Village was established in 1966 to encourage self-sufficiency, community living and the creation of a South Indian visual identity. Since then, it has undergone a transformative journey. Discover its history and achievements.
09 Oct 2023
Between the seventh and ninth centuries, south peninsular India experienced a cultural renaissance, resulting from the extensive patronage of a powerful dynasty, the Pallavas. Discover their unique contributions to the arts and literature of the time, which led to the creation of a new, Dravidian idiom of temple architecture in South Asia.
24 Sep 2023
Amidst the political tumult of nineteenth-century colonial India, Abanindranath Tagore — an artist from Bengal — set out to invent a new ‘Indian’ visual language, rejecting European artistic ideals. He pioneered a style that combined themes from mythology, history, and rural life, with elements from India’s miniature painting traditions. This would evolve into the Bengal School — a movement that reimagined a distinctly Indian approach to art. Tagore influenced an entire generation of artists and left a lasting impact on the quest for Indian identity during the struggle for Independence.
11 Sep 2023
In the mid-sixteenth century, Mughal emperor Humayun brought two Persian master painters to India, who not only established an imperial atelier but also began a major tradition of miniature painting in South Asia — Mughal manuscript paintings. This painting tradition flourished for centuries, enjoying royal patronage and resulted in the illustration of significant literary texts, scriptures, biographies, dynastic histories and scientific literature. Known for their naturalism and intricacy, Mughal paintings also combined a range of influences — Persian, Indian and European — and were often made collaboratively by artists and other specialists in the imperial ateliers, known as kitabkhanas. Discover the legacy and lasting influence of this painting tradition and its eventual decline in the late eighteenth century.
28 Aug 2023
Traditionally woven in Gujarat, India, mashru — meaning ‘lawful’ or ‘permitted’ in Arabic — was invented to allow Muslims to wear silk garments despite injunctions against it in the Hadith, an important Islamic religious text offering teachings and moral guidance. The fabric’s innovative weaving technique, where each silk warp crosses six cotton wefts, keeps silk from touching the body when worn. Whilst the earliest visual references to mashru date back to the seventeenth-century in the Deccan region of southern India, the fabric has lived many lives, gaining popularity amongst Islamic populations in India, West Asia and Africa as it was traded along Indian Ocean maritime routes.
14 Aug 2023
In the early seventeenth century, a new painting tradition — characterised by its use of bold colours, gilding and gem-setting — emerged in the Thanjavur region of southern India. While Thanjavur paintings originally featured gods and saints, the tradition grew to incorporate secular subjects owing to a range of influences over the next several centuries, including Mughal, Maratha, and European art. Thanjavur paintings continue to be popular as memorabilia and worship objects, and are one the most recognisable South Indian painting styles today.
19 Jun 2023
Elaborately carved with female figures and floral motifs, ringstones dating to the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC are amongst the most enigmatic artefacts of Mauryan and Shunga art. Scholars continue to speculate about their use, and believe that they may have been used as amulets and ritualistic objects or designators. Discover more about these ancient artefacts through this article.
04 Jun 2023
Beginning in the fifteenth century, until the nineteenth century, artists turned to classical music for inspiration, combining painting, allegory and music to create a genre known as Ragamala painting. Ragas — melodic frameworks central to Indian classical music — date back to nearly the fifth century, and each major raga is meant to evoke a particular mood or atmosphere, a season and a time of day. Ragamala paintings are distinctive for their nuanced depiction of emotions through environmental metaphors and imagery that often includes a hero or a heroine or both.
Context dependence in intercultural communication
26 May 2023
Osaka Metropolitan University scientists found that Japanese and Chinese, who are considered to have high-context cultures with a high degree of reliance on information shared by the speaker and listener, are code-switching from high-context cultures to low-context cultures when communicating with people from each other’s country. Furthermore, the scientists found that the Japanese do not engage in much code-switching with Chinese students in Japan.
23 Apr 2023
Born out of the changing society of nineteenth-century Calcutta, Kalighat painting was a popular medium among the patuas (painters) who worked in the vicinity of the Kalighat temple. Though these paintings were originally intended to be souvenirs for devotees visiting the temple and featured primarily Hindu imagery, they expanded over time to include other religious traditions as well as socio-political commentary.

Events

30 May 2024 to 31 May 2024
The two-day online seminar “Exploring Ethics in Transnational Media Collaboration” will take place on May 30th and 31st. Speakers from Sri Lanka, India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, the UK, the USA, Canada, Germany, Africa, and Nigeria will discuss important topics such as storytelling, decolonizing feminism, and the challenges of transnational media research.
16 Nov 2023
The conference is a forum for experts and leaders in the media industry both domestically and internationally. At ICMC 2023, we aim to explore the diverse aspects of digital communication in the context that data science and AI are increasingly involved in the production cycle and operation of the media and communication industry, thereby capturing the opportunities and challenges presented by these technologies.
29 Feb 2024 to 02 Mar 2024
Calling interested media studies practitioners, educators, researchers and enthusiasts! In line with the upcoming Southeast Asian Media Studies Conference (SEAMSC 2024), we are thrilled to announce that we are calling for paper submissions related to the conference’s theme: “Interrogations of Media, Sustainability, Development and Power in ASEAN”.
09 Jun 2022 to 11 Jun 2022
After a successful launch of the Inaugural Southeast Asian Media Studies Conference 2021 (SEAMSC'2021), the Southeast Asian Media Studies Association (SEAMSA) are delighted to announce the 2nd edition of the annual conference, the Southeast Asian Media Studies Conference 2022 (SEAMSC'2022), which will be held from 9-11 June 2022 using a virtual platform.
15 Oct 2020 to 25 Oct 2020
The Science Walden Center of South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), in collaboration with Artist Jieun Gu exhibited an art work, along the Taehwa River in Ulsan, S. Korea.
10 Sep 2019
South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology is delighted to announce the HFE Labs’ Demonstration Day is scheduled to be held on September 10, 2019.
05 Nov 2019 to 06 Nov 2019
Asia's largest education exhibition and conference. Bringing together the entire education sector in South East Asia to learn, be inspired and exchange ideas.
05 Jun 2019 to 07 Jun 2019
One massive congress covering 5 streams covering the whole education life cycle. Co-located with EduBUILD.

Researchers

I'm currently an adjunct professor at the Asian Institute of Management in Manila. I crafted a course called Art-Science Thinking based on my dissertation on Culture as Transformative Innovation: Filipino Care in the Practice of Family Medicine. Since 2017, my consultancy & studio has been collaborating with the Dept. of Science & Technology in the Philippines.
LE THU MACH holds a PhD in Journalism (Monash University, Australia). She is a lecturer at the Ho Chi Minh National Academy of Politics, Vietnam. Her research interests include journalism, social media, public sphere, media research ethics, advertising, and public relations. Since 2022, she has been serving as the External Relations Director on the Executive Board of the Southeast Asian Media Studies Association (SEAMSA).
Emilie Yeh Yueh-yu
Professor Yeh is a recognized specialist in Chinese and Asian cinema studies.
Picture of Dr. Chi-hin Leung
Dr Leung Chi-Hin’s compositions mix elements of East and West, in the process revealing the composer’s diverse cultural background and his particular interest in timbral and textural explorations
Dr.Hung Keung
Dr. Hung Keung is an internationally renowned digital media artist, researcher, scholar and designer, who has been involved in the creative and research aspects of film, video and digital new media art around the world since 1995.

Giants in history

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