History

News

13 Jun 2024
In the same way that the number of rings in a tree can tell us its age, the characteristics of rocks such as breccia can tell us about the history of a region. The breccia around Ichinokawa Mine (located in Ehime prefecture) are of particular interest, as the mine is located south of the Median Tectonic Line. Researchers at Tohoku University uncovered how breccia can provide valuable evidence to estimate the energy of past earthquakes in the area.
30 May 2024
Renowned for its gleaming silver and gold inlay against dark metallic backgrounds, Bidriware metal work derives its name from the town of its origin — Bidar in southern India. While the earliest documented presence of Bidriware is in a 1625 Deccani miniature painting, the craft is believed to have originated in the 14th century under the patronage of the Bahmani Sultans. Bidriware's allure ensured that it was valued and patronised by royalty across the Indian subcontinent in the late medieval and early modern period. Read about this living tradition, and the processes behind the creation of Bidriware.
The 2023/24 Territory-wide Junior Secondary Chinese History and Culture Quiz is successfully concluded.
18 May 2024
The finals of the 2023/24 Territory-wide Junior Secondary Chinese History and Culture Quiz, organised by the Hong Kong Government Education Bureau (EDB) and co-organised by the Hong Kong and South China Historical Research Programme (HKSCHRP) of Lingnan University, were held on campus today (18 May). Officiating guests were Ms Teresa Chan Mo-ngan, Deputy Secretary of the EDB,and Prof Lau Chi-pang, Associate Vice-President (Academic Affairs and External Relations) and Co-ordinator of the HKSCHRP. ProfVincent Leung Sueh-han, Head and Associate Professor of the Department of History at Lingnan University, Prof Tam Ka-chai, Associate Professor of the Department of History at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU), Dr Fan Wing-chung, Senior Lecturer of HKBU, and Dr Law Yuen-han, Lecturer I at the Department of History at HKBU, judged the competition.
17 May 2024
Asia Research News monitors the latest research news in Asia. Some highlights that caught our attention this week are how negative rumors affect children, a new fiber-sorting method, and an ancient Egyptian “anomaly”.
13 May 2024
Late in the sixteenth century, a master artist from the Mughal emperor Akbar’s atelier adopted the technique of using monochromatic tones with highlights of colour or gold. Known as ‘nim qalam,’ Persian for ‘half pen,’ or ‘siyah qalam’ for ‘black pen’, this technique was eventually adopted by artists in the Deccan, and later the Rajput courts. Although its precise origins remain uncertain, nim qalam continues to be used by contemporary South Asian artists working on manuscript painting.
Watching over with minimal intervention is a hallmark of early childhood education in Japan.
19 Apr 2024
Watching and waiting with minimal intervention forms educational philosophy guided by balance
15 Apr 2024
Once a two-armed attendant to the goddess Tara, over time, Marichi was increasingly endowed with power until she became a deity in her own right. Revered as a warrior and guardian against evil and darkness, Marichi’s imagery reveals myriad symbolisms — from her association with the sun to her role as a fierce protector. Read about the multifaceted nature of Marichi's mythology and imagery, spanning nations, cultures, and time.
01 Apr 2024
In India’s dry, western-most state — Rajasthan — the gods are carried from village to village, and tales that surround the deity are narrated so that the devout may be blessed. The gods are housed in a ‘kavad’, a portable shrine adorned with intricate narrative paintings of folk tales and epics. Constructed from low-density wood and painted with mineral-derived pigments, the kavad serves as a conduit for the oral storytelling tradition known as kavad banchana. Learn about the synergy between the makers, painters and patrons of these shrines, and how this tradition continues to evolve.
29 Mar 2024
Asia Research News monitors the latest research news in Asia. Some highlights that caught our attention this week are spiders that join together to transform into a flower, birds giving the right of way, and a potential natural treatment for hair loss.
19 Mar 2024
In the late 1930s, French archaeologists discovered a large and remarkable group of ivory sculptures, in Afghanistan's Begram (present-day Bagram). Stipulated to have been used as accents or embellishments for wooden furniture, these carved objects showcase a blend of Greco-Roman, Central Asian, Mediterranean, and Indic stylistic influences. Despite the political upheavals in the region, some of these ivory artefacts still survive. Explore how ongoing scholarly efforts shed light on the historical significance of these art objects, highlighting the cultural connections that were built and flourished along the Silk Road.
Group photo of guests at the Launch Ceremony of LingArt Programme on the Promotion & Inheritance of Chinese Culture.
31 Jan 2024
Lingnan University is honoured to receive a generous donation of HK$3.88 million from the Lingnan Education Organization (LEO) to support the commencement of the two-year LingArt Programme on the Promotion & Inheritance of Chinese Culture (LingArt Programme). It aims to promote Chinese culture and show its grandeur and uniqueness through a series of cultural and artistic activities, so as to foster a deeper understanding of the rich and diverse heritage of China in both local and international students, as well as to nurture a sense of national belonging in local students.
Prof S. Joe Qin, President of Lingnan University, presents souvenirs to Prof Gregory Chow Chi-chong and his wife, Paula Chow. (From left to right: President Qin, Prof Chow, Paula Chow)
23 Jan 2024
To strengthen connections with alumni and showcase the university's rich history and accomplishments, Lingnan University in Hong Kong has initiated a series of alumni interview activities. The first session, led by Prof S. Joe Qin, President and Wai Kee Kau Chair Professor of Data Science of Lingnan University, featured a conversation with distinguished alumnus and renowned economist Prof Gregory Chow Chi-chong in the US.
12 Jan 2024
Asia Research News monitors the latest research news in Asia. Some highlights that caught our attention this week are how a King Kongesque ape went extinct, how antibodies can make you dizzy, and a material that can break down harmful chemicals using the sun.
05 Jan 2024
Asia Research News monitors the latest research news in Asia. Some highlights that caught our attention this week are self-sacrificing cancer cells, tiny new drones that kill cancer cells and a living “skin” that covers the Great Wall of China.
06 Nov 2023
Since the 3rd century CE, master puppeteers of southern India have brought the epics of the subcontinent to life through Tholu Bommalata, a form of shadow puppetry performed with elaborate, life-sized leather puppets. Come discover this intricate musical theatre tradition that has been passed down from generation to generation and continues to thrive to this day.
20 Oct 2023
The Cholamandal Artists' Village was established in 1966 to encourage self-sufficiency, community living and the creation of a South Indian visual identity. Since then, it has undergone a transformative journey. Discover its history and achievements.
09 Oct 2023
Between the seventh and ninth centuries, south peninsular India experienced a cultural renaissance, resulting from the extensive patronage of a powerful dynasty, the Pallavas. Discover their unique contributions to the arts and literature of the time, which led to the creation of a new, Dravidian idiom of temple architecture in South Asia.
06 Oct 2023
Asia Research News monitors the latest research news in Asia. Some highlights that caught our attention this week are the confirmation of a route that humans took to migrate from Africa, how pheromones can influence beetle behavior, and microplastics found in cloud water.
24 Sep 2023
Amidst the political tumult of nineteenth-century colonial India, Abanindranath Tagore — an artist from Bengal — set out to invent a new ‘Indian’ visual language, rejecting European artistic ideals. He pioneered a style that combined themes from mythology, history, and rural life, with elements from India’s miniature painting traditions. This would evolve into the Bengal School — a movement that reimagined a distinctly Indian approach to art. Tagore influenced an entire generation of artists and left a lasting impact on the quest for Indian identity during the struggle for Independence.
13 Sep 2023
Oriental literature in general, Vietnamese literature in particular, has many types of values, perspectives, new identities and unique similarities. Read on to explore......
11 Sep 2023
In the mid-sixteenth century, Mughal emperor Humayun brought two Persian master painters to India, who not only established an imperial atelier but also began a major tradition of miniature painting in South Asia — Mughal manuscript paintings. This painting tradition flourished for centuries, enjoying royal patronage and resulted in the illustration of significant literary texts, scriptures, biographies, dynastic histories and scientific literature. Known for their naturalism and intricacy, Mughal paintings also combined a range of influences — Persian, Indian and European — and were often made collaboratively by artists and other specialists in the imperial ateliers, known as kitabkhanas. Discover the legacy and lasting influence of this painting tradition and its eventual decline in the late eighteenth century.
28 Aug 2023
Traditionally woven in Gujarat, India, mashru — meaning ‘lawful’ or ‘permitted’ in Arabic — was invented to allow Muslims to wear silk garments despite injunctions against it in the Hadith, an important Islamic religious text offering teachings and moral guidance. The fabric’s innovative weaving technique, where each silk warp crosses six cotton wefts, keeps silk from touching the body when worn. Whilst the earliest visual references to mashru date back to the seventeenth-century in the Deccan region of southern India, the fabric has lived many lives, gaining popularity amongst Islamic populations in India, West Asia and Africa as it was traded along Indian Ocean maritime routes.
18 Aug 2023
Asia Research News monitors the latest research news in Asia. Some highlights that caught our attention this week are vegan 3D printed calamari rings, 4 000-year-old ceramic pipes and ditches, and how swirling stars make some rethink how gravity works.
14 Aug 2023
In the early seventeenth century, a new painting tradition — characterised by its use of bold colours, gilding and gem-setting — emerged in the Thanjavur region of southern India. While Thanjavur paintings originally featured gods and saints, the tradition grew to incorporate secular subjects owing to a range of influences over the next several centuries, including Mughal, Maratha, and European art. Thanjavur paintings continue to be popular as memorabilia and worship objects, and are one the most recognisable South Indian painting styles today.
JHSSR Vol. 5 (1) Jul. 2023
14 Aug 2023
Greetings from JHSSR, Horizon is proud to announce the highly acclaimed publication of the latest issue of 2023, Vol. 5, Issue 1 (Jul. 2023). The issue is now live at the Journal’s webpage. You may explore our range of contributions within this Issue. Explore this issue, click the links below.
11 Aug 2023
Asia Research News monitors the latest research news in Asia. Some highlights that caught our attention this week are particle pollution linked to antibiotic resistance and microplastics being found in the body, fossils that show a marine reptile that used filter feeding, and how a connection in our brains compares our rewards to ones that others received.
04 Aug 2023
Asia Research News monitors the latest research news in Asia. Some highlights that caught our attention this week are how the tobacco plant could be used to help treat cancer, how lifting weights is good for your skin, and a glue that can be switched on and off.
31 Jul 2023
Backstrap looms are portable weaving contraptions with a component that is tied around the weaver’s waist, thereby engaging the weaver’s entire body in the process of creating textile out of warp and weft. Historical and archaeological evidence suggests that these looms, which presumably date as far back as the Bronze Age in China, have been, and continue to be, used by indigenous communities worldwide.
28 Jul 2023
Asia Research News monitors the latest research news in Asia. Some highlights that caught our attention this week are a powerful telescope that can catch rogue planets, a new dinosaur species found in Thailand, and 600-million-year-old water droplets.
25 Jul 2023
Miyako Islands are home to various native species of snake and lizards. How these species came to call these islands home has long puzzled scientists. A group of researchers from Tohoku University have compiled the latest geological and biological data, proposing that an island once facilitated migration between Okinawa and Miyako Islands.

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Researchers

I'm currently an adjunct professor at the Asian Institute of Management in Manila. I crafted a course called Art-Science Thinking based on my dissertation on Culture as Transformative Innovation: Filipino Care in the Practice of Family Medicine. Since 2017, my consultancy & studio has been collaborating with the Dept. of Science & Technology in the Philippines.
Doctoral Student 博士生, Faculty of East Asian Studies, Ruhr-Universität Bochum 波鴻魯爾大學東亞學系 (Germany)
Trần Thị Vân Dung was born in Vietnam in 1978. In 2006, she graduated from Hue University with a Bachelor of Pedagogy in Linguistics. In 2013, she received a Master of Vietnamese Literature from the University of Sciences, Hue University. Currently, she is undertaking a Ph.D. course in Vietnamese Literature at Hanoi National University of Education, Vietnam. She has been the principal lecturer at Thua Thien Hue Pedagogical College since 2013. She sits on the reviewer board of Horizon Journal of Humanities & Social Sciences Research, a prominent scholarly peer-reviewed leading journal.
Southeast Asia Media Studies Association
University professor with 20 years of experience in Thailand's secondary and higher education sectors.
I am Grace Joy Palmes Betonio currently taking Bachelor or Secondary Education Major in Filipino. I am in my 4th year.
DOCTORAL CANDIDATE AT JAWAHARLAL NEHRU UNIVERSITY, NEW DELHI, INDIA
Southeast Asia Media Studies Association
Mary Anne Mallari specializes in film and literary criticism.
Hadiyanto is a researcher at Universitas Jambi in the area of social science, particularly in education. In 2021, He was invited as a speaker AIbotic Series, European Week, and Edutech.
City University of Hong Kong (CityU)
Picture of Dr. Tsui Lik Hang
Dr.Tsui Lik Hang specializes in middle period Chinese history and culture, as well as the digital humanities. He is currently writing a book on Song dynasty epistolary culture and planning another one on digital humanities in China.
Universiti Malaysia Sabah
Dr. Connie Cassy Ompok is an early childhood education expert and a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Psychology and Education, Universiti Malaysia Sabah. She Started her career in Early Childhood Education as a preschool teacher (2004-2007), a lecturer in early childhood education at the Malaysian Institute of Teacher Education (2008-2016) before serving as a Senior Lecturer in Early Childhood Education at UMS (2016 until now).
I'm Senior Lecturer at the School of East Asian Studies, University of Sheffiield. I research and teach about post-developmental Japan in the Asia-Pacific region.
Picture of Sachiko Kawai
My research on how medieval Japanese royal women strategized to overcome disparity is relevant in a time when COVID-19 has exposed ongoing problems tied to the vulnerability of (Japanese) women and gender stereotypes (e.g. recent remarks by Tokyo Olympics chief Mori).
Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM)
Dr Heo is currently a senior lecturer at the Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA, Malaysia.
Universiti Malaysia Sabah
Sanen Marshall is a US Fulbright Scholar (2017) and a UK Chevening Scholar who teaches at the Centre for the Promotion of Knowledge and Language Learning, Universiti Malaysia Sabah.

Giants in history

Through her iconic stories featuring fictional scenes from the history of the Philippines, language teacher and academic Genoveva Matute (3 January 1915 – 21 March 2009) helped strengthen the Filipino identity.
Hwang Hye-seong (5 July 1920 – 14 December 2006) was an expert on Korean royal court cuisine, the knowledge of which she dedicated her career to keeping alive. Formerly an assistant professor of nutritional science, Hwang met the last kitchen court lady in the Joseon Dynasty Han Hui-sun and, from her, learned about the culinary traditions of the royal court.