Japan

News

14 Feb 2024
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners succeeded in biomanufacturing from chemically synthesized sugar for the first time in the world. With refinement of this technology, one can envision a future society in which the sugar required for biomanufacturing can be obtained "anytime, anywhere, and at high rate". In the future, biomanufacturing using chemically synthesized sugar is expected to be a game changer in the biotechnology field—including the production of biochemicals, biofuels, and food, where sugar is an essential raw material—ultimately leading to the creation of a new bio-industry.
14 Feb 2024
An innovative and more efficient way to produce fumaric acid that not only reduces carbon dioxide emissions, but also reuses waste resources to make biodegradable plastics
14 Feb 2024
Researchers from Osaka University have found that gargling with an antiseptic mouthwash can reduce so-called ‘bad’ bacteria in the mouths of patients with type 2 diabetes. Notably, this reduction in bacteria was accompanied by improved blood-sugar control in some patients. Given that the oral diseases caused by these bacteria have been linked to many other serious inflammation-associated diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease, this simple treatment may have widespread effects.
13 Feb 2024
The properties of supramolecular polymers are dictated by the self-assembled state of the molecules. However, not much is known about the impact of morphologies on the properties of nano- and mesoscopic-scale polymeric assemblies. Recently, a research team demonstrated how terminus-free toroids and random coils derived from the same luminescent molecule show different photophysical properties. The team also presented a novel method for purifying the toroidal structure.
13 Feb 2024
Researchers from the Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo have solved a foundational problem in transmitting quantum information, which could dramatically enhance the utility of integrated circuits and quantum computing.
13 Feb 2024
Researchers including Kavli IPMU have used equipment originally intended for astronomy observation to capture transformations in the nuclear structure of atomic nuclei, reports a study in Scientific Reports.
3D structures
08 Feb 2024
A trained AI system learns to design cellular materials with specific target properties for a wide range of potential uses, including tissue engineering and energy storage.
yellow spheres
08 Feb 2024
A new coating for tiny vaccine carriers allows vaccines to remain in the body for longer.
glacier and marine snow
07 Feb 2024
Yokohama National University scientists are working towards creating a better tomorrow by addressing diverse challenges, from snow algae and tropical cyclones to AI cyberthreats, and much more.
Artist’s impression of an outflow of molecular gas from the quasar J2054-0005 (Credit: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO))
01 Feb 2024
Theoretical predictions have been confirmed with the discovery of an outflow of molecular gas from a quasar when the Universe was less than a billion years old.
01 Feb 2024
Researchers from Osaka University and IMRA AMERICA demonstrated a 300 GHz-band wireless link that was able to transmit data over a single channel at a rate of 240 gigabits per second. The wireless communication system employs signal generators based on lasers that have ultra-low phase noise in the sub-terahertz band. This rate is the highest so far reported at these frequencies and is a substantial step forward in 300 GHz-band communications for 6G networks.
30 Jan 2024
A team of researchers from Osaka Metropolitan University assessed the feasibility of conducting cardiopulmonary exercise testing with the upper limbs as an alternative to the conventional method that uses the lower limbs. The researchers investigated the relationship between heart rate and oxygen uptake during exercise stress tests using a cycle ergometer and an arm crank ergometer, and estimated maximal oxygen uptake. The study participants were 17 male collegiate athletes from rowing and cycling clubs. The results showed that the estimated maximal oxygen uptake for both rowing and cycling groups was lower on the arm crank ergometer than on the cycle ergometer. Additionally, this study showed that exercise testing using an upper extremity ergometer underestimates cardiopulmonary function, regardless of upper limb training status.
Compared with untreated cancer, the TRED-I system significantly reduced cancer size in mice models. (Xin Sun, et al. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. January 29, 2024)
29 Jan 2024
A new technology to increase visibility of cancer cells to the immune system using CRISPR has been developed, and could lead to a new way to treat cancer.
Schematics of wake behind a sphere moving from right to left in quantum liquid He-II
29 Jan 2024
A theoretical framework for measuring the Reynolds similitude in superfluids could help demonstrate the existence of quantum viscosity
Flow structure around a dragonfly wing model
23 Jan 2024
Corrugated wings exhibit larger lift than flat wings
23 Jan 2024
Researchers from SANKEN (The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research), at Osaka University developed an optical sensor consisting of carbon nanotube photodetectors and organic transistors formed on an ultrathin, flexible polymer film. A wireless system reads the images from the sensor. Experiments showed the sensor has high sensitivity, a wide bandwidth, and robustness to extreme deformation such as bending and crumpling. This sensor has high potential for use in applications such as non-destructive imaging, non-sampling liquid quality evaluation, wearable devices, and soft robotics.
Depiction of europium complexes changing structure upon interacting with a tumor cell. (Mengfei Wang, et al. Scientific Reports. January 22, 2024)
22 Jan 2024
A water-soluble, luminescent europium complex enables evaluation of malignancy grade in model glioma tumor cells.
19 Jan 2024
Temperature-controlled, reversible shifting of molecular gear motion in a solid crystal opens new possibilities for material design.
18 Jan 2024
A research group led by Osaka Metropolitan University has discovered significant nonreciprocal optical absorption of LiNiPO4, referred to as the optical diode effect, in which divalent nickel (Ni2+) ions are responsible for magnetism, by passing light at shortwave infrared wavelengths used in optical communications. Furthermore, they have uncovered that it is possible to switch the optical diode effect by applying a magnetic field. This is a step forward in the development of an innovative optical isolator that is more compact and can control light propagation, replacing the conventional optical isolators with complex structures
16 Jan 2024
Researchers from Osaka University have discovered a novel treatment to relieve cytokine release syndrome (CRS), a life-threatening inflammation triggered by a serious infection or severe burn. Treatment with a short-acting antibody reduces the inflammatory effects of interleukin-6, a key cytokine in CRS while avoiding the side effects associated with previous longer-acting therapies.
Screening of PFAS binding potential to PPARα using an explainable machine learning approach
16 Jan 2024
7000 forever chemicals (PFAS) and human PPARa binding properties predicted using AI technology
16 Jan 2024
Researchers from Osaka University have simplified the operation of an important class of chemical transformation: synthesis of beta-lactams, the intricate scaffold of many antibiotics. Their experimental protocol minimizes the toxicity that is a common feature of similar Fischer-carbene synthetic methodologies, and was used to synthesize the scaffold of the thienamycin antibiotic in high yield. This work is an important advancement in sustainable chemistry that should benefit drug development and other chemical syntheses.
15 Jan 2024
Researchers from Osaka University and collaborating partners have helped minimize the cost of an important class of chemical transformations: converting nitriles into primary amines. Their experimental protocol uses a cheap nickel catalyst instead of an expensive noble metal, is convenient to conduct, and works for a broad range of starting materials. This work is an important advance in sustainable chemistry that might help lower the cost of producing nylon and many other everyday products.
12 Jan 2024
Tohoku University researchers have unveiled a new approach to treating lymph node metastasis. The process invovled administering anticancer drugs directly into the lymph nodes, producing better outcomes and lessening the side effects commonly associated with cancer treatment.
11 Jan 2024
Researchers at the Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo create customizable polymer molds to produce cost-effective arrays of microneedles that can be used to uniquely identify pets with alphanumeric symbols instead of tags or collars.
11 Jan 2024
Researchers from Osaka University found that CD4+ T cells can be classified into 18 categories and 12 distinct gene programs, and that characteristic changes in CD4+ T cell profiles are associated with autoimmune disease, sex, and aging. Analysis of these distinctive immune cell profiles could be used to predict autoimmune disease in the future, paving the way for precision medicine.
11 Jan 2024
Researchers at Nano Life Science Institute (WPI-NanoLSI), Kanazawa University report in Nano Letters how the flexibility of a protein hinge plays a crucial role in the transfer of proteins in key cell processes.
11 Jan 2024
Researchers from SANKEN (The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research), at Osaka University, Shizuoka Institute of Science & Technology, and collaborating partners have resolved a problem that has limited the environmental sustainability of peracid synthesis. By judicious choice of the solvent and light input, approximately room-temperature autoxidation of aldehydes proceeds in a manner that results in industrially useful peracids or carboxylic acids. This work is an important advance in green chemistry that will help minimize the carbon footprint of the chemical industry.
A domino reaction is a series of chemical reactions where each reaction triggers the next reaction in the series, like falling dominoes (top). In a domino redox reaction, each reaction causes a structural change that triggers the next redox reaction in the series (bottom). (Takashi Harimoto, et al. Angewandte Chemie International Edition. November 28, 2023)
09 Jan 2024
Transmitting an effect known as a domino reaction using redox chemistry has been achieved for the first time.
09 Jan 2024
A research team from Osaka University, The University of Tokyo, and Tokyo Institute of Technology revealed the microscopic origin of the large magnetoelectric effect in interfacial multiferroics composed of the ferromagnetic Co2FeSi Heusler alloy and the piezoelectric material. They observed element-specific changes in the orbital magnetic moments in the interfacial multiferroic material using an X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) measurement under the application of an electric field, and they showed the change contributes to the large magnetoelectric effect. The findings provide guidelines for designing materials with a large magnetoelectric effect, and it will be useful in developing new information writing technology that consumes less power in spintronic memory devices. The research results will be shown in an article, “Strain-induced specific orbital control in a Heusler alloy-based interfacial multiferroics” published in NPG Asia Materials.

Events

25 Mar 2010
Three experts of IP & Technology Transfer in the forefront medical field, such as regenerative medicine are invited from US. What are challenges and problems typical in this field? What’s the strategy of prosecution and commercialization in this field? Speech and discussion are expected.
23 Mar 2010
"Frontiers in Organogenesis"
09 Mar 2010
International Symposium "Let's Talk About Infrahuman Intelligence" is to be held as follows. * Admission free, no registration required. *This event will be held in English; no interpretation provided.
05 Mar 2010
International Symposium on Designing Governance for Civil Society
04 Mar 2010
As a part of the Project for Establishing Core Universities for Internationalization (Global 30), the Faculty of Environment and Information Studies will launch a new program named “Global Information and Communication Technology and Governance Academic (GIGA) Program” in September 2011.
18 Feb 2010
Keio Media Design launches an information session at New York!
18 Feb 2010
RIKEN will be hosting a booth at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), to be held in San Diego, Feb. 18-22. The AAAS is a global organization dedicated to advancing science around the world.
11 Jan 2010
The objective of the RIKEN Conference is to advance the physical, chemical, biological, medical, and engineering sciences and to promote practical application in these disciplines, as well as to provide an international interdisciplinary forum for discussion among scientists.
12 Jan 2010
JUNBA (Japanese University Network in the Bay Area) will hold its Symposium and Technology Fair on Tuesday, January 12th, 2010.
30 Jan 2010
International GCOE Symposium on Neurocognitive Development "Shedding Light on Developing Brain" is to be held as follows.  *Admission free, registration is required.  *This event will be held in English; no interpretation will be provided.
08 Dec 2009
Time & Date: Tuesday 8th December 2009, 13:00 – 16:30 (Registration starts at 12:30) Venue: 2 Fl, Conference Hall, Old University Library, Keio University Mita Campus Admission Free - Advance registration essential (See below)
14 Dec 2009
The increasingly complex and interconnected world in which we live poses broad new challenges for science and society. Among the most important are global climate change, clean energy, population growth, sustainable food and water supplies, and the development of effective social organizations on both local and global scales.
14 Dec 2009
International Symposium on Complex Systems "Toward Sustainable Social Systems: Phase transition - Evolution - Polysemy" is to be held as follows. * Admission free, Online registration is required.(Deadline: Friday, 11th December, 2009) *This event will be held in English; no interpretation will be provided.
11 Dec 2009
Date December 11th (Fri) 2009, 10:00-17:00 Venue Tokyo International Forum - Hall B7 and Hall B5 Admission Free of charge (Reservation is not necessary.) Organizer Keio Leading-edge Laboratory of Science and Technology [KLL] (Keio University Faculty of Science and Technology / Graduate School of Science and Technology)
13 Dec 2009
Keio Media Design launches an information session at Malaysia (KL)!
11 Dec 2009
Keio Media Design launches an information session at National University of Singapore (NUS)!
30 Oct 2009
The Public Role of Higher Education in a Changing Global Environment Multi-polar initiatives through Linkages and Dialogues
06 Nov 2009
Keio Symposium Mexico and Japan: Opportunities to Enhance Regional Competitiveness in Asia Pacific on November 6
12 Mar 2010
The Tokyo Conference on Psycholinguistics welcomes papers that represent any scientific endeavor that addresses itself to “Plato’s Problem” concerning language acquisition: “How we can gain a rich linguistic system given our fragmentary and impoverished experience?”
28 May 2009
Please join us for exploring KMD and discussing with our distinct faculty members for your learning opportunity.
13 May 2009
International Symposium Presented by Waseda University Organization for Japan-US Studies Research Group “International Cooperation”
06 Apr 2009
On the occasion of the 110th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Greece and Japan, an exhibition of subway art from Athens will open at the Tokyo National Museum on April 7, preceded by a symposium at Keio University on April 6, 2009.
19 Dec 2008
The theme of this year's exhibition, "Innovative frontiers dreams" allows visitors to view the fruits in science and technology nurtured by Keio University - celebrating the 150th anniversary of our founding - while at the same time getting a sense of the University's future hopes.
22 Nov 2008
This is a revolutionary Okinawan exhibition that introduces works such as modern Okinawan art and photography.
18 Dec 2008
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of Herbert von Karajan, and a variety of commemorative events are being held throughout the world. The Waseda Symphony Orchestra, which possesses deep relationship with Karajan, is part of commemorative events to celebrate this distinguished man.
21 Nov 2008
Keio Digital Archive Research Center and King's College Centre for Computing in the Humanities Conference
05 Dec 2008
The troubles in US subprime lending that began in 2007 proved to be a catalyst to failures of gigantic financial services companies around the world. To understand the present world business, we are starting a series of global business seminars, first with INDIA.
07 Nov 2008
A ceremony to commemorate Keio University's 150th anniversary will be held at the Hiyoshi Campus on Saturday, November 8, 2008. The occasion will be attended by some 10 000 people, including alumni, students, and guests from Japan and abroad.
07 Nov 2008
A Japanese Takigi Noh Performance will be held at Keio University as part of the 150th Anniversary celebrations.
07 Nov 2008
Invited speakers from China, Korea, the UK, and the US will discuss "The Future of Asia" and Keio University's role in the future of higher education in Japan, Asia, and the world.

Researchers

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Giants in history

Ruby Sakae Hirose (1904 – 1960) was a Japanese-American scientist whose research contributed significantly to our understanding of blood clotting, allergies and cancer.
Haisako Koyama (1916 – 1997) was a Japanese solar observer whose dedication to recording sunspots – cooler parts of the sun’s surface that appear dark – produced a sunspot record of historic importance.
Michiaki Takahashi (17 February 1928 – 16 December 2013) was a Japanese virologist who developed the first chickenpox vaccine.
Toshiko Yuasa (11 December 1909 – 1 February 1980) was the first Japanese female physicist whose research on radioactivity shed light on beta decay – the process in which an atom emits a beta particle (electron) and turns into a different element.
Baron Kitasato Shibasaburo (29 January 1856 – 13 June 1931) was a Japanese physician and bacteriologist whose work led to a new understanding of preventing and treating tetanus, diphtheria and anthrax.
By isolating soil microorganisms and studying the compounds they produce, Satoshi Omura (born 1935) discovered almost 500 organic compounds with unique properties that were produced by these microorganisms, including many new antibiotics.
In 1915, pathologist Katsusaburo Yamagiwa and his research assistant Koichi Ichikawa became the first to prove that chronic exposure to chemicals can cause cancer.
In 1915, Koichi Ichikawa along with pathologist Katsusaburo Yamagiwa became the first to prove that chronic exposure to chemicals can cause cancer.
Reiji Okazaki (8 October 1930 – 1 August 1975) and Tsuneko (7 June 1933) were a Japanese couple who discovered Okazaki fragments – short sequences of DNA that are synthesized during DNA replication and linked together to form a continuous strand.
Tsuneko (7 June 1933) and Reiji Okazaki (8 October 1930 – 1 August 1975) were a Japanese couple who discovered Okazaki fragments – short sequences of DNA that are synthesized during DNA replication and linked together to form a continuous strand.
Husband and wife team, Kimishige (3 December 1925 – 6 July 2018) and Teruko Ishizaka (28 September 1926 – 4 June 2019) discovered the antibody class Immunoglobulin E (IgE) that triggers allergic reactions. They also discovered that IgE antibodies attach to white blood cells, known as mast cells, releasing histamine, which causes allergic reactions.
Husband and wife team, Kimishige (3 December 1925 – 6 July 2018) and Teruko Ishizaka (28 September 1926 – 4 June 2019) discovered the antibody class Immunoglobulin E (IgE) that triggers allergic reactions. They also discovered that IgE antibodies attach to white blood cells, known as mast cells, releasing histamine, which causes allergic reactions.
Japanese chemist Takamine Jokichi (3 November 1854 – 22 July 1922) founded the Tokyo Artificial Fertilizer Company, where he isolated a starch-digesting enzyme (named takadiastase) from the fungus Aspergillus oryzae.
Hideki Yukawa (23 January 1907 – 8 September 1981) was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1949 for predicting the existence of the pi meson subatomic particle. Japan’s first Nobel laureate, Yakawa also expressed his support for nuclear disarmament by signing the Russell–Einstein Manifesto in 1955.
Shinichiro Tomonaga (31 March 1906 – 8 July 1979), together with Richard Feynman and Julian Schwinger, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965, for their contributions to advance the field of quantum electrodynamics. Tomonaga was also a strong proponent of peace, who actively campaigned against the proliferation of nuclear weapons and promoted the peaceful use of nuclear energy.
Japanese chemist Kenichi Fukui (4 October 1918 – 9 January 1998) was the first Asian scientist to be awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Together with Roald Hoffman, he received this honour in 1981 for his independent research into the mechanisms of chemical reactions.
Minoru Shirota (April 23, 1899 – March 10, 1982) was a Japanese microbiologist who invented the popular fermented drink Yakult.
Japanese physicist Ukichiro Nakaya (1900-1962) made the world’s first artificial snowflakes. He started his research on snow crystals in the early 1930s at Hokkaido University, where there is an unlimited supply of natural snow in winter. By taking over 3,000 photographs, he established a classification of natural snow crystals and described their relationship with weather conditions.
The techniques that make industrial pearl culturing possible were developed over a century ago at the Misaki Marine Biological Station in Japan. The station’s first director, Professor Kakichi Mitsukuri, emphasized to Kokichi Mikimoto in 1890 that stimulating pearl sac formation was important for pearl growth, and they went on to successfully develop methods for culturing pearls.
The field of solid-state ionics originated in Europe, but Takehiko Takahashi of Nagoya University in Japan was the first to coin the term ‘solid ionics’ in 1967. ‘Solid-state ionics’ first appeared in 1971 in another of his papers, and was likely a play on ‘solid-state electronics’, another rapidly growing field at the time.
Chika Kuroda (24 March 1884 – 8 November 1968) was a Japanese chemist whose research focussed on the structures of natural pigments.
Motoo Kimura (13 November 1924 – 13 November 1994) was a Japanese theoretical population geneticist who is best remembered for developing the neutral theory of molecular evolution.
Osamu Shimomura (27 August 1928 – 19 October 2018) was a Japanese organic chemist and marine biologist who dedicated his career to understanding how organisms emitted light.
Kikunae Ikeda (8 October 1864 – 3 May 1936) was a Japanese chemist who discovered the fifth basic taste, umami.
Umetaro Suzuki (7 April 1874 – 20 September 1943) was a Japanese scientist best remembered for his research on beriberi, a disease caused by vitamin B1 deficiency, characterized by limb stiffness, paralysis and pain.
Kono Yasui (16 February 1880 – 24 March 1971) was a Japanese botanist who researched the genetics of poppies, corn and spiderworts and surveyed the plants that had been affected by the nuclear fallout after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Hitoshi Kihara (1893 – 1986) was one of the most famous Japanese geneticists of the 20th century. One of his most significant contributions was identifying sex chromosomes (X and Y) in flowering plants.
Michiyo Tsujimura (17 September 1888 – 1 June 1969) was a Japanese agricultural scientist and biochemist recognized for her research of green tea components.
A Japanese surgeon, Tetsuzo Akutsu (20 August 1922 – 9 August 2007) built the first artificial heart capable of keeping an animal alive.
Ogino Ginko (3 March 1851 – 23 June 1913) was the first registered female doctor to practise modern medicine in Japan.
Japanese geochemist Katsuko Saruhashi developed the first method and tools for measuring carbon dioxide in seawater